Tuesday, 26 October 2010

The Right to Strike

"Is the Fire Brigades Union decision to call a strike on Bonfire Night akin to the police withdrawing their labour as terrorists decide to `do a Mumbai`  in Manchester and is it a responsible act that will galvanise public support and sympathy"? Discuss? Nah

10 comments:

CI-Roller Dude said...

We have a law in California...the cops and fire fighters can not strike. We can picket off duty etc, but we can not walk off the job. Something about public safety and all.

Hogday said...

CI-RD: Ditto in the UK, but only for the for the po-lice. In my 30 years I've played ambulance crewman, supported the Army firefighting squads and run a joint police/ambulance/fire control response during the various strikes from those disciplines. Doesn't make me respect ambulance or fire and rescue any less, though. The only time the police went on strike was in 1919 and it was after that the law was introduced.

TonyF said...

Ah, the smell of Green Goddesses smouldering. The look of DPM clad heroes wondering which to put out first. Actually I were right lucky, I was on armed guard the last time the firemen went on strike (And I was still in) so I only could have been shot at, and or, blown up. Not fried as well.

Fortunately, we have retained Fire-fighters in our village, they also act as first responders to any 999 call not needing police. Good lads, the lot of them.

Hogday said...

TonyF: I was `outriding` for a Green Goddess on a shout on my job motorcycle. I didn't realise, until a very crucial moment, that they were only allowed about 4 high speed brakings per 5 mile journey or the buggers overheated and faded out. The crew were as white as sheets, poor sods.

Blue Eyes said...

I don't think anyone would notice the difference if the fire or police services went on strike for a day or two at a time, except if the media pointed it out.

Hogday said...

Thats probably right, Blue. The most subtle security is the nagging doubt of not knowing if you're going to get away with the bad deed or not. If you were expecting a visit from the Israeli Ambassador at 10.30 this morning, and it was 100% guaranteed that only you and the vip knew that fact, there would be no need for security in your street. Give him my regards! (No bacon sarnies, mind)

allcoppedout said...

Always sad strikes - I had a bit-hand in threatening the police one in 76ish - the offer went up from 3% to 40% over two years and loads of special case rhetoric from Wilson.
Industrial relations in the UK are pathetic, but we have forgotten just what unions and solidarity have done for us. I have several large theses on offer Hog, but suspect their only use would be in being able to turn round in a couple of years and say 'I told you so'. This will be the first of many strikes. I guess cops will once again vote for a right to strike - though none of us in the UK actually have one.
No Green Goddesses this time - we sent them off abroad as aid. Watch out for the private sector cavalry this time - my guess is they won't be able to put out fires or create jobs!

Hogday said...

ACO: I remember that Edmund Davis pay review. I happened to be smack in the centre of his demographic, the length of service band that they most wanted to retain and saw my pay increase by a whopping 43% - unbelievable today, but then of course there was runaway inflation at the time.

Colin said...

Recently did a Cat'A pick up from HMP and got talking to a P.O. who was asking about the current threats to our employment. He told me that the P.O.'s voted for a salary deal which included the right to strike back in the day and guess what they have now had that right repealed....
Perhaps if things do go bad a touch of solidarity between the front line (PC,PS) with an attached working to regulations would bring on a rethink?

Hogday said...

Colin: There was much talk of industrial action back in the mid 70's. I always felt that, as good as the case and the talk might have been, come the day the Fed Rep leading us up the road to the local prison would find the crowd that originally gathered for the pep talk at The Guildhall, would have all but disappeared by the time the prison gates hove into sight, having ducked down various sidestreets en route. He would be left stood outside on his own :)